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, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are
here tonight will become president of the united states. the candidates are senator dan quayle and lloyd bentsen, the democratic nominee. [applause] for the next 90 minutes, we will be questioning the candidates following a format designed and agreed to by representatives of the two campaigns. however, there are america rigid restrictions on the questions my colleagues and i may ask. the first question goes to senator quayle. you have to the minister responded. you have been criticized for your decision to stay out of the vietnam war, for your poor economic -- academic record. more troubling by some of the comments to have made in your own party. a separate -- secretary of the state said your peck was the dumbest mistake george bush could have made it. your leader added to the senate said a better qualified person could have been chosen. other republicans have been more critical in private. why do you think you have not made a more substantial impression on some of the people who have been able to observe the up close? >> the question goes to whether yes or qualified to be the
and three other americans and marked the first assassination of a sitting united states ambassador in almost three decades. wendell has the news from the white house. republican complaints involved more than inadequate security at the consulate. >>reporter: they accusing the administration of misleading the public for a week by suggesting the attack grew from a protest against an anti-islam film made in this country. that film triggered protests in other arab countries including in cairo earlier on september 11th. in the debate last night, republican challenger paul ryan suggested the president blamed the film for the embassy attack. in a speech at the united nations, two weeks later, he blamed them. >> he went to the u.n. and said six times talked about the youtube video. look, if we hit by terrorists we will call it for what it is: a terrorist attack. our ambassador in paris has a marine detachment regarding him. shouldn't we have one regarding our ambassador in benghazi? >> there is a marine detachment at embassy in tripoli but not the consulate where ambassador stevens was killed. >>trac
number one. united states is richer on a per capita basis by a magnitude of about tenfold, but china will have more economic output than the united states. it is a force that has to be reckoned with. they got this way because they have had very good growth for a number of years, but it is growing a little bit too strong. there are some small bubbles popping up in different parts of their economy, and they are trying to slow down the economy. slowing down an economy -- every government can do that. the hard part is controlling that downward trajectory. in most cases, countries that tried to slow down their economy -- they go into a crash, they go into a recession, but china is different. the best way i have to describe china's economy, to steal a line from yogi berra is one-half market economy and three- quarters centralize control economy. they are big enough. they are powerful enough that they can probably pull this off. we will have to see how it happens, but that is an important thing for the world economy. europe, on the other hand, is another story. if you believe in
at an advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the question is addre
are approached or anything happens in your professional lives with the united states government that you have any questions about, please come to this committee. we take the work of whistle- blowers and people who give testimony very seriously. you have been critical to bring out things which would not have -- which would not have come out to. i will close with two comments. that i took away from today. he did not produce security at -- you do not reduce security at the -- the same time as you are increasing hazardous duty pay. it does not make sense. i have not heard that question asked and answered. i only heard that it occurred. i think the state department to take away from today and understanding that that sends a message that says, we will pay you for the risk. we will not pay to have you made safer. that is the impression that anyone would get if you reduce the staffing below recommendations or request an increase the pay. i do not think the men and women who service overseas want. i know the compensation for hardship is important, but safety comes first. i have the marine fellow who work
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all t
president of the united states to help and support this next week in this great nation and to make sure we maintain america as the hope of the earth's protective so much. >> gentlemen, thank you so much. that brings an end to this year's debates in the want to thank lynn university and its students. i leave you with the words of my mom said, go vote. good night. >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [applause] >> as we continue to watch the scene on the campus of lynn university, our phone lines are open. your reaction to this third and final debate. the focus, for policy. first up, rose, a supporter of mitt romney from nevada. good evening. ." >> i wanted to say something about the moderator. been one-sided, i think. i believe in governor romney and i hope people open their eyes and take notice of what's going on in our country. >> thank you for the call. on our twitter page, when you were saying -- and david, dayton, ohio. supporter of the president. >> go ahead. host>> i am
made it to the united states yea 1975 when i told them that ith, was for a class assignment. finl in one fell swoop, i got my le homework done and the history. e when i land, when i was five not months old, my family come andn you have to understand that family in thefa vietnamese contd doesn't mean that nuclearaal aud context. grandm my family including my mom and dad, my maternal aunt and grandmother and the elder brothers and sisters, just barely escaped saigon in 1975. it was full of twists and turnsk and happenstance. we easily could have been sucke back in vietnam rather than escape to america. so on that day, and it was april 29, 1975, as white chr tristmas layout played out again and again on the american radio station, this was thenel signal for u.s. personnel to s move to our evacuation points and cities. my father who had served in the top vietnamese army understood that it was time that we, too, prepared to leave our home his country. for months, he and his kin had planned possible escape routes and finally decided on one.safe. his cousin had access to a helicopter tha
of the united states. you add those three elements together, and you get the obama hate machine. so i'd just like to say a little bit about each of those elements and open it up for questions until c-span tells us the cameras are turned off. and let's start at those directed against obama. i think criticism of obama -- [inaudible] and every day in front of the white house on pennsylvania avenue there's a crowd of people protesting something, you know? and i love that, i really do. i always make a point of checking out what they're there for, what the issue of the day is. it's a very healthy part of our democracy. and criticism of presidents, of course, has been around for a long time. if you want to go back to the ugliest presidential campaign in history, you could probably go back to 800 and john adams -- 1800 and john adams and thomas jefferson. particularly the followers against each other. so, um, but with president obama it's been attacks not on his policies so much as on him as a person. and we haven't seen that, i don't believe -- and i went back and did a lot of research in president
.d.'s are coming from the united states, in our most complete engineering schools. that is a recipe for disaster. that is a recipe for disaster. we do not ever talk about it. we're just letting the thing unraveled. what about best new engineering schools, which you will be hearing about in a few days, in dallas, and they have a great school, but guess what -- i asked them onetime how many people they have from china, and this university right here, 2000, added to the top. >> this is an example of how we need to modernize our immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scho
that it goes unremarked upon. if you want to know about a country look at the map of the united states in terms of the harbors from the east coast of the united states, the 13 colonies jam packed with natural harbors. the coast of africa collectively few good natural harbors but the east coast was packed with them and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't
legislature. but i'm also a serious guy. i think the presidency of the united states is a very serious office, and i think we have to address these issues in a very serious way. so i hope and expect that i will be liked by the people of this country as president of the united states. i certainly hope i will be liked by them on the 8th of november. [laughter] but i also think it's important to be somebody who is willing to make those tough choices. now, we have just heard two or three times from the vice president he's not going to raise taxes. i repeat, within days after you made that pledge, you broke it. you said, well, maybe as a last resort we'll do it. and you supported legislation this year that's involved tax increases not once, but twice. so that pledge isn't realistic, and i think the vice president knows it. i think the people of this country know it. the fact of the matter is that the next president of the united states is going to have to go to the white house seriously, he is going to have to work with the congress seriously. he can't turn to the congress and blame them for the f
is the chief executive officer of the united states. whoever the next president is, they need to demonstrate extraordinary presidential leadership. they need to use the power of the presidency to go to the american people, as ross perot did in 1992, to build a case that we are on a burning platform, to help them understand that everything has to be on the table, to provide principles and a framework for action, and to call the first three words of the constitution "we the people" to work with the president to solve the problem, because if you do not keep the economy strong, everything will suffer over time -- job opportunities, domestic tranquility. >> did you feel in 1992 and 1996, that we can get out of our deficits, and we ran four years of surpluses, prior to 9/11 and other things that happened in the last decade. did you think we had solved our problems? >> no, we were just lucky where weaver going through a good time. now we are any time of bad luck. i would really impressed if our president would take this issue right now and explain to the american people what he is going to do, beca
does. he's both very commit very visible, he's something like a 70% name recognition united states. that's it you justin bieber. or we'd all we'd all probably know what he does. and when you go back over history and look at the thing starting to unfold in the election, he has deniability of one level after another. to me, the story became interested in a way because most people thought karl rove was finished in 2008 in the bush presidency started to come to an end. he had been forced out of the white house in 2007. he was the prime target in the two biggest scandals of the bush era, the valley plan affair in the united states attorney scandal. bush left a 22% approval rating from lowest in the history of the united states. and even top republican strategists like adderall and said that his version was tainted forever. no one would ever want to be a bush republican and work with karl rove. and the fact of the matter is he was back working again within a matter of weeks. and it became evident to me in early 2010 from about a year after obama took office. three things happen. the firs
. a lot of people i've heard about the trade conflict between the united states and china on solar panels. this is an interesting prism to view the chinese economy more broadly because this is a classic case of china really pushing hard for big innovation and winding up with little innovation that doesn't get them to where they want to go and part of china's innovation policy is targeting strategic emerging industries. these are the industries that beijing thinks will be the industry's of the future. the biggest is green energy including solar and wind and electric vehicles and other green energy technologies so they have unleashed a lot of funding to support grain energy innovation. most of that funding has created instead of mosul products continuing the same old model process innovation which is making the products created in the west faster and cheaper and therefore using that to take away some of the u.s. market share. they've been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than other countries around the world and therefore they are subs
am running for the united states senate. to change the want leadership in washington. we can change that. that is why i am running for the senate. i want to pass a balanced budget. i am not your usual politician. i'm not one of the good old boys pay ed i will make this tough decisions in the united states senate. i will roll up my sleeves, work hard for you, and i will fight for you. >> now the opening statement from bob kerrey. >> thank you. i love nebraska. i always have and i always will. i was born here in lincoln. i left nebraska and went to war and came home, and i recovered from illness in the lincoln. i started a business that employed more than 700 people. i served as your governor, balancing our budget, and i left after four years and went back to business. i served as your son that -- as your senator, and again we balance our budget. i am a candidate for congress for the senate because congress needs to change, and i will fight to make that happen. i have never had and never will be a cookie cutter politician. i never have and never will be anything other than someone who
for president of the united states. >> today in a "democracy now!" special, we look at the life and legacy of senator george mcgovern, best known for running against president richard nixon and an anti-4 platform. >> as one whose heart has eight for the past 10 years of the agony of vietnam, i will hold the senseless bombing on and our role day. >> as a family spokesperson confirms senator mcgovern is in hospice care, unresponsive and there in the end of his life, we will play extended excerpts of the documentary "one bright shining moment: the forgotten summer of george mcgovern." it traces his historic campaigne presidency. >> that is the highlight of my life, i guess, winning the democratic nomination of the oldest political party in american history. i remember excited faces, people laughing and talking, some weeping. there was a lot of emotion and passion in that campaign. and i will take those memories with me the rest of my life. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we're on the road in sacramento,
there will be changes in the united states senate, if tim is in, he will be in there for the same folks he's campaigning for all of these years when he was chair of the democratic national committee, ignoring the needs, dire needs of people in virginia. i want to see change in washington, those positive, constructive ideas that can get this country going in the right direction. i believe we ought to get united behind the mission of sending a message to the world that america is open for business again. i think that anybody who pays taxes should be on our side unless you want to pay higher taxes. if you use electricity, you ought on our side. if you want more affordable electricity. if you drive a car and don't like the fact you're paying over $30 more every time you fill up, you ought to be on our side. if you agree with me doctors and patients ought to be making health care decisions rather then panels of bureaucrats up in washington, you ought to be on our side. if you're working for a living or if you want a job, the approach i have been advocating has proven to work. over 300,000 net new jobs create
and influential spokesman for the worlds of finance and business in the united states. the way it is going to work today is seen narrowing to have this conversation for a few minutes and then and we will open and up to you all for your questions. let me just give one are to conflict of interest on the table. the corporate member. the council on foreign relations, one of around 175 corporate members, and i am a shareholder in the company. unfortunately i am a distinct minority shareholder. i wish it were enough to present a conflict of interest, but is not. of greek heritage. so let's -- the last 24 hours the chancellor of germany has been visiting the country of your ancestors, of your four bears. how worried are you about the prospects for greece cack and what it might mean not just for greece and not just for europe, but the globalization and economic linkages for the estates and indirectly your own institutions . so thank you for the introduction. my ancestors, he can blame me for what's going on there. as a side note i remember my grandfather coming home years ago and yelling and screaming abo
. thinking has been around for several hundred years. under the united states constitution the ability to create money as part of the united states prompted the united states constitution. forever 200 years a lot of that has been outsourced to the private-sector, today least 90% of our money supply so to speak is produced by the commercial banking industry. i am not even mentioning some of the other parts of the financial services industry. for the last nearly 100 years, the fed has been involved and not outsourcing. and the lender of last resort is there to support the banking industry. and for the last 75 plus years we have the fdic providing another part of the federal safety net, to make the banking industry the commercial banking industry much more robust. so to me this is all about the safety net. but it is also time to roll back the safety net, because when we think about the money supply, what we used to pay for things, that is where we have the safety net here. it also need to recognize the the united states dollar is holding be fed currency of the world. many of our transacti
security threat to the united states and to israel. that's why i authorized the most crippling sanctions one country has ever eleven individual against another against iran. the results of that we just saw in news reports this week their currency devalued by 40%. the shipments of oil dramatically reduced hurting their economy. those sanctions i co-authorized is to create an economic news to deter them from seeking nuclear weapons. so i believe these sanctions still have time. it is been suggestioned the time clock is sometime next year. if these sanctions cripple their economy, i think we can deter them. >> well, that all sounds just fine but unfortunately, it doesn't appear that the sanctions are working. too little, too late and it's a very critical time for our country and for the world at large. and so i know that as a member of the senate, i'm going to do everything humanly possible through my vote, through advocacy and in every other way to make sure that iran never, never gets a nuclear weapon. this is the greatest threat to our country and to the world. and i just hope that the f
powder with the maritime powers, like brittany is to be our today, the united states. and then, there is an american and he put these two ideas together. and where the two great powers, the land power and d.c. power come together, he called the shout about. and the middle east is located in one of the world's great shutterbugs. the interesting thing is about them is that small states have the ability to shift the power from one large side to the other, simply because it depends on which side they're on or which side they decide to shift two. in the middle east, the old part with syria and is today. but, after the fall of the soviet union, after the end of the cold war, there was another heart. since the entire east were taking place at that time, when the circulation state joined the middle east, when afghanistan pushed the edge of the middle east. and so today, we have a second part inside the middle east and that is iran. and those two cards, with their particular allies are causing this growing second global cold war. now the first indication we have is that is the reincarna
. >>shepard: officials reportedly say the united states may have put too much faith in newly trained libyan security guards. catherine is live from washington, dc, with the story. what do we know of the libyan security guards? >>reporter: intelligence sources tell fox that the libyan security forces "melted away when the attack happened" and there is "confirmation the security for the consulate, some elements, were acting in concert with the terrorists." a short time ago, as to the status of the consulate, the state department is sending all questions to the f.b.i. >> all of the officials having to do with the staws of the scene in benghazi, what it was, what it is, they are now the province of the f.b.i. as they go forward with this investigation. i will send you to them on any those questions. >>reporter: as we reported, 20 days of at murder of the four americans, the f.b.i. has yet to step foot in benghazi. in other words, we have a situation in eastern libya where the mission is part of a wild west and we do not have any firm control of that. >>shepard: a lot of people are weighing in o
. obviously, the campaign is for the united states senate. the filibuster has been used in this current united states senate all a long. hasn't been accused? >> i think every party will always see the other party abuses. i like the system. i like the requirement because to get 60 votes. requires working across the aisle. i think that's something i'm well-suited for. so i would not vote to get rid of the filibuster. sometimes it is abused by both parties. >> from 1917-1970, 50 cloture vote. this current senate, 109th cloture vote. what is going on? >> you have a dysfunctional senate. we haven't had a budget passed innocent in more than three years but someone mentioned the other day the last time the senate passed the budget, the apple ipad had not been invented yet. >> how can it be functional is the filibuster is always wearing its had? >> they can. we've had the filibuster for years and with a functional senate. as senator mccain said the other day this is the first time in 51 years that the senate hasn't passed a defense authorization bill. the problem right now, i don't think we will convi
against the president of the united states. you add those three elements together, and you get the obama hate machine. so i'd just like to say a little bit about each of those elements and open it up for questions until c-span tells us the cameras are turned off. and let's start at those directed against obama. i think criticism of obama -- [inaudible] and every day in front of the white house on pennsylvania avenue there's a crowd of people protesting something, you know? and i love that, i really do. i always make a point of checking out what they're there for, what the issue of the day is. it's a very healthy part of our democracy. and criticism of presidents, of course, has been around for a long time. if you want to go back to the ugliest presidential campaign in history, you could probably go back to 800 and john adams -- 1800 and john adams and thomas jefferson. particularly the followers against each other. so, um, but with president obama it's been attacks not on his policies so much as on him as a person. and we haven't seen that, i don't believe -- and i went back and did a lo
for the one eyed terror suspect extradicted here to the united states the we have new details from the hearing today. plus, some people are paying $5 and even up to $6 a gallon for gas! a fillup under those numbers could cost hundreds of bucks for some trucks. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios >>shepard: the one eyed terror suspect today pleaded not guilty for plotting to set up a terrorist training camp. in oregon. he and four others suspected terrorists arrived in the united states on saturday after they lost a legal battle to keep them in british custody. the terrorist suspect lost part of his arm in a fight against the soviets in afghanistan back if the day. they say he usually wears a hook but today he appeared in court with no hook, no nothing. a prison spokesman said they would not comment on individual inmates but in general, they remove prosthetics if they could pose a danger to anyone else. the chief fox correspondent is live outside the courthous
the united states government or any other organization i'm a part of, and therefore, now, i can be a troublemaker. i'm focusing on the countries of egypt, libya, and tunisia, and focus more on egypt because i spent 20 years on the country, lived there for six years, and there for six weeks during the summer time. algeria and morocco have been peaceful, but don't count on it. algeria and libya or net oil exporters to help them get on their feet if they do not focus too much on that. as the ambassador said, libya's back to 1.4 million barrels a day, almost miraculous given the countries that have gone through things like this. algeria produces about the same amount of oil as libya, but it has six times the people so there's a lot more people to spread that across. algeria produces 2.3 cubic feet of gas a year, and if you do the math, it's a billion cubic feet per person in both countries, and if distributed nicely, everyone would be well-off, but we all know that's not the way it is. egypt is a net oil importer. it is a gas exporter, but right now, mostly lng because the pipelines
mcveigh, you can find that in the unabomber's writing, this becomes the united states government. and i don't think anybody would have any fault with that one, would they now? no, we can actually see the seven-headed dragon: one head being the atf, the fbi, the justice department, you know, the irs. yeah, that's right up there; that's the antichrist. this is the way it's going- the government, it becomes the antichrist. armageddon, then, is not a plain in israel- you know, koresh literally took it to texas- but it's right here. the united states is armageddon; this is where the mother of all battles is going to take place. babylon, the whore, the harlot of babylon in revelation- if you haven't looked at the book, you kind of have to go back and look at some of these images- but that's corrupt, materialistic, secular humanism, multiculturalism, globalism, the whole mishmash that says everybody belongs. uh - uh. only good christians in that interpretation, but people who believe in the american way belong. you know, you get that feeling in militia groups. the messiah doesn't tend to be a
the relationship between the united states and jordan a strongnete cl w a of the possible consequences of what is happening in syria. >> that could include syrian artillery shells inordan as they have in southern turkey. arer bge tshgelsedhe stakes at impromptu news conference visiting his troops on the border. saying that if syria continues to shell his country, they would respond with greater force. heptunlyhig comess sn ghki fs t attack rebel positions in border villages. the headline of u.s. troops now on the ground in jordan and turkish etorncin i ta diplomati equivalent of baby steps toward what is still distant possibility of military intervention against the syrian regime. back to you. >> bret: leland vittert live inhe middle east nsroom. dofo thtexo qio te sr1 to 36288 for great deal. sr2 for somewhat. sr3 for not at all. results a littleater. grapevine is next. ths om lko hed ofla switching to geico sure are happy. i'd say happier than a slinky on an escalator. get happy. get geico. melons!!! oh yeah!! fowhvedrofdos chtocoee y. well that was uncalled for. w happy, ronny? happier th
at the united states because as you have said that has happened too often in the past. that tragedy should occur we have to step in without any margin for error, enough time for preparation to take over the responsibilities for the biggest job in the world, that of running this great country of ours, to take over the awesome responsibility for commanding the nuclear weaponry that this country has. the debate tonight is a debate about a presidential decision that has to be made by you. the stakes could not be higher. >> moderator: senator bentsen question for you and you have two minutes to respond. what bothers people was not so much for qualification, but your split on policy with governor dukakis. he has said that he does not want to clone himself, but you disagree with him on some major issues, a that the in nicaragua conference, did the death penalty, gun-control among others. if you had to step into the presidency, whose agenda would you pursue, yours or his? >> i am delighted to respond to that question. because we agree on so many things and in the best majority of the issues, we agree on
for united states citizens first. >> as double of the mexico i ran a completely out of the political system, i got elected republican governor and state that was 2-1 democrat and made a name for myself of vetoing legislation. i'd be done more legislation than the other 49 governors in the country combined. i b to add 750 bills, and thousands of line item vetoes, it made a difference when it can to billions of dollars worth of spending, it made a difference when it came to laws that would have told you are by what i could or couldn't do in the bedroom. host: here johnson reports that he will appear on the ballot in 48 states including some of battlegrounds. and in colorado, new hampshire and an ohio -- johnson could be a thorn in romney side if the election is close. and in virginia, virgil goode could be a problem for gov. romney in that state as well. here is more from a third-party presidential debate. with the other candidates. [video clip] >> there are 90 million voters who are not coming out to vote in this election. that is one out of every two of voters, twice as many as the number w
that if the republicans take over control of the united states senate, they have made it clear that in order to pay for the tax cuts for the richest americans, they will make cuts elsewhere. what is the only proposal on the table? more than half a trillion dollars in cuts in education, basic infrastructure, and research. to have a good, federal partner in washington, we have to make funding education a priority. >> this question goes to elizabeth warren. can you tell us where you would look first and last? can you identify two federal programs that can be cut, and two he would work hard to protect? >> you are exactly right. we will have to take a balanced approach. i would be clear in terms of cutting the agricultural subsidy programs. it is time to cut in our military budget. we are winding out of one war. we can realign our priorities. on the other hand, i want to make clear i will not go to washington to cut medicare or social security benefits. [applause] when we talk about a balanced approach, we need to be talking about spending cuts and we need to be talking about increasing revenues. it tak
ago you told the "desert sun" that it was in our best interest that the united states remain in both iraq and afghanistan. last months you told the veterans that if president obama couldn't outline a clear and concise explanation of why troops remain in afghanistan, then the u.s. should "get the hell out." what prompted such a change in perspective, and if the u.s. pulled out immediately, how do you address concern that the enemy will fill the void? >> let me go back to a little bit more thorough reporting than that. and the article is there. but what i did say is as long as president obama cannot articulate to the american people why we are there and what we are doing, but allowing our troops to flounder because he feels comfortable because he has given a timeline for withdrawal, that troubles me greatly. under this presidential leadership, yes, i am concerned about our troops being deployed in afghanistan, absolutely. but you know what else troubles me about this timeline of president obama's, which is an arbitrary political timeline? he didn't get that from the generals, he got it
comprise not haphazardly but purposefully a history of the united states for the last 200 or so years. a number of these books have been best sellers. traitor to his class and the first american were both finalists for the pulitzer prize and you can see h. w. brands on tv all the time if you go to the history channel or turn on the tv, there he is. this book is -- i will hold this up again so you can see and recognize it easily at the book signing tend, it is a tremendous biography of ulysses grant filled with stuffed i certainly never knew and was delighted to find out. it is very authoritatively and readable. before we get to grant himself i wanted to ask bill a broad question about biography. here at the book festival there are a number of biographers. i have read several of these already, robert caro's latest volume in his massive history, biography of lyndon johnson. janet reed's biography leonard cohen, all these people at the book festival among others. david maraniss is here with a book about obama. i was curious because all these books are so different in terms of authors's a
to be president president of the united states. is a democratic analyst, to us it just sort of reignited the whole medicare issue because you know we have spent a lot of time and glen and i do senate and house campaigns, talking about the ryan plan. and you know, sometimes we talk about the ryan plan without saying the ryan plan because people didn't know who paul ryan was. well, now they do and now they know there is a ryan plan on medicare. so in the polling we have done and i'm sure glen has done polling of his own, we see it's an effective message for democrats against republicans to talk about the ryan plan and the republican plan on medicare. >> before you jump and glen let me push back a little here. >> go right ahead. [laughter] >> a day or two before governor romney made his decision on running mates i was talking with stan greenberg, another democratic pollster and he runs a democracy corps with james carville and they have been desperately trying to use the ryan plan you know, to basically beat republican members of congress about the head with the ryan plan and with minimal success bec
want to reward small businesses and manufacturers who are creating jobs right here in the united states of america. [cheers and applause] second, my plan will cut our oil imports in half by 2020 so we control more of our own energy here in america. megyn: and here's a look at why the president stayed in florida after last night's debate in boca raton. the latest polling average from realclearpolitics.com that averages all the polls shows romney leading among likely voters with nearly 48.5% and the president averaging around 46.5%. if you look at the more recent polling, it looks very much in governor romney's favor. we've told you earlier that suffolk polling pulled out a while back saying they don't believe that's competitive any longer although clearly team obama disagrees with that. critical state, as you know, in this election. governor romney, meantime, now working to shore up support in the nevada with paul ryan. the pair set to appear in henderson together just about a couple of hours from now. nevada is another battleground this year, and you can see why the governor is there. t
basis. pretty much every day, i will look at scotus blog, supreme court of the united states. or there is a blog called "how appealing." there are a variety of blogs, written by law professors. some are more conservative and some are more liberal. i will look at those every once in awhile and see what people are saying and thinking and writing about legal issues. i find them interesting and occasionally useful. you know. it is the world i come from, as you know. i am not going to say, i am never going to read the law review article again. >> do you read them before, as you are trying to sort through cases? >> usually only when the briefs point them out. i rarely do an independent search. >> you talked about the role of clerks in sorting through the cert petitions. in recent years, the court has taken many fewer cases than it did in an earlier area. -- earlier era. maybe there are fewer circuits and fewer important issues, but that seems unlikely. do you have a sense of whether the court is taking the right number? >> the truth is, i do not know if it is unlikely, for this rea
of the united states referred to it as act of terror after it occurred. >> the day after the attack. no acts of terror will shake the resolve of the nation. >> carney tried to use the quick mention by the president on september 1112 to suggest the administration is consistent to call it terror. >> we kept saying we don't know. >> the issue was what led to the test. that has been an issue we provided assessments of, based on the information we have gleaned through the intelligence community. preliminary information. >> two days after the president's mention of terror, carney did not say terror. >> it was in response to a video. a film. that we have judged to be reprehensible and disgusting. >> two more days later, fox's chris wallace asked ambassador rice if she believed what carney said. >> chris, absolutely, i believe that. what sparked recent violence was the airing on the internet of a very hateful, offensive video. >> republican senator bob corker just back from an official trip to libya charged today rice was in his words thrown under the bus. >> what the white house has done to save th
as president of the united states. [applause] crowd: four more years! >> you know, over the last four years, i have seen a lot of folks hurt. i have seen a lot of struggle. and i am not going to make -- i am not going to have us go back to another round of top-down economics. but that is what my opponent is offering. the centerpiece of governor plan, favorsomic the wealthiest americans. he has been pitching the plan an entire year. he stood up on stage in a primary debate and proudly declared his tax cuts would include the top 1%. most of the economists that crunched the numbers said paying for the tax plan either means blowing up the deficit or raising taxes on middle-class families. one or the other. pick your poison. last week, mitt romney said, there is no addition to the deficit with my tax plan. if he says it is not true, then it is not true. ok. it is true that it is not going to add to the deficit, that leaves only one option. that is asking middle-class families to foot the bill by getting rid of the deductions for owning a home, raising kids, or sending them to college. as it turned
. that was the recommendation in the oval office to the president of united states of america. i sat there. i am sure you will find someone who disagrees with the pentagon. i am positive you will find that within the military. that is not the case here. host: does one of the several clips we will show you during the first 45 minutes. but your thoughts on the roles of the moderator. let us start with a tweet. he says -- in both debates but moderators acted as a big lead democrats are good and republicans can sometimes be good, maybe. here is a call on the democrat's line. from texas, arleen. caller: the first one was not so good. the lady thursday night i think was good, but she was more on foreign policy -- i wished there would have been more on the economy and jobs. that is what you are looking for? caller: yes. and i think joe biden did a great job. host: what about martha raddatz 's style? caller: they did not go overboard. like the first debate. she kind of maintained it very well. host: on our line for republicans, walter, from indiana. caller: good morning. i do not know what the first color was wa
of united states of using a government program to manipulate people do not get a job, to be dependent on the government for services? >> i'm impressed. we are a few minutes and -- >> let me finish. >> i am impressed. we are a few minutes in and you have now three times called me crazy on observing that the president has expanded government dependency. >> you are saying he is manipulating american so they will vote democratic. >> let's talk about the issue of benefits. in 1960, 20% -- of federal spending went to individual payments. this year, 65% of federal spending goes to individual payments. i would suggest we do have a problem with government -- >> we had a downturn in the economy. we have hard times, people looking for work and not able to find jobs. >> 65% of federal spending going to individual payments. it may not sound good, but we have created a welfare state. >> to blame it all on president obama is even worse. to declare the president of the united states is manipulating so people will stay and vote democrat? i think that is the most ridiculous thing i have ever heard. suc
in the solar panels to the united states. to u.s. citizens have cleaner air but we do not. that's a really big problem. that's an old model. the old model. the new model would be if they cannot only create the manufacturing solar panel but also creating new innovative types of technology that might be way more efficient than what we have to. but also in staunton and consumed by an adult. that is very, very difficult to do because that requires central government to break past some very powerful state owned on ane interest, including coal country, power generation companies and state creates. the state grid corporation controls china's national utility grid. they can do 80% of the chinese territory. they have been really dragging their heels connecting wind and solar resources to the great. so getting that side of equation right is going to really critical going forward, but very, very difficult to do. and so that raises the question of whether this new leadership is really going to be able to get things done, we don't know the full politburo standing committee. we do come in now the top three
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